Viewing entries in
PSA

The Dreaded Four Way Stop Sign Issues

The Dreaded Four Way Stop Sign Issues

Traffic Tuesday - who has the right of way at a stop sign?

Stop sign intersections can be some of the most frustrating. How many times have you sat at a stop sign trying to go through the intersection, but other drivers go before you out of turn? If all drivers understood the law, the frustration could be easily alleviated.

Florida Statute 316.123 Vehicle entering stop or yield intersection.

(1) The right-of-way at an intersection may be indicated by stop signs or yield signs as authorized in s. 316.006.

(2)(a) Except when directed to proceed by a police officer or traffic control signal, every driver of a vehicle approaching a stop intersection indicated by a stop sign shall stop at a clearly marked stop line, but if none, before entering the crosswalk on the near side of the intersection or, if none, then at the point nearest the intersecting roadway where the driver has a view of approaching traffic on the intersecting roadway before entering the intersection. After having stopped, the driver shall yield the right-of-way to any vehicle which has entered the intersection from another highway or which is approaching so closely on said highway as to constitute an immediate hazard during the time when the driver is moving across or within the intersection.

In this section, the statute clearly says that you can not enter an intersection until you can move within or across the intersection.  This is understandable.  Do not pull out until it is clear. The next section is where people either do not understand, or decide to not obey.

(b) At a four-way stop intersection, the driver of the first vehicle to stop at the intersection shall be the first to proceed. If two or more vehicles reach the four-way stop intersection at the same time, the driver of the vehicle on the left shall yield the right-of-way to the vehicle on the right.

The first vehicle to stop at the intersection has the right of way and should be the first to proceed through the intersection. At a four way stop if two vehicles arrive at the same time, the driver to the left has to yield the right of way to the driver on the right. Sounds pretty simple, but many drivers do not obey this. Attached is a simple video that shows the proper way to yield the right of way at a four way stop sign intersection.

Drive Safe!!!

About the Author:

Master Sergeant Patrick O'Grady is a 24 year veteran of law enforcement, assigned to the Office of the Chief of Police. He serves as a Public Affairs Officer for the Cape Coral Police Department and oversees the Public Affairs Office and the Planning and Research Unit.

IMG_5502.jpg

Master Sergeant O’Grady has previously served as a Patrol Officer, Field Training Officer, DUI Officer, Drug Recognition Expert and a Traffic Homicide Investigator. He has also served as a supervisor in the Patrol Bureau over district officers and the Field Training and Evaluation Program. Master Sergeant O’Grady has served in the Special Operations Bureau as a supervisor of the Nighttime Traffic Unit and Major Crash Investigators. He is an instructor for the Cape Coral Police Department on several different topic areas and holds several certifications. 

Master Sergeant O’Grady holds a Bachelors Degree in Criminal Justice from Hodges University.

###


CAPE CORAL POLICE DEPARTMENT | Public Affairs Office | 1100 Cultural Park Boulevard | Cape Coral, FL 33990 | (239) 242-3341

U-Turns: Who Has The Right of Way?

U-Turns: Who Has The Right of Way?

(July 9, 2019) - For today’s “Traffic Tuesday” we are going to touch on U-Turns and who has the right-of-way in these situations. As not only a police officer in a marked and unmarked vehicle, but as a person driving with his family in the car, I have been frustrated at times with the lack of knowledge about the right-of-way dealing with u-turns. Let’s start with what the Florida state statute says:

316.1515 Limitations on turning around.—The driver of any vehicle shall not turn the vehicle so as to proceed in the opposite direction upon any street unless such movement can be made in safety and without interfering with other traffic and unless such movement is not prohibited by posted traffic control signs. 

What does this mean?  No one can turn their car in a u-turn fashion interfering with traffic unless such movement is not prohibited by posted traffic control signs. If you are a driver on another roadway with a red light or a stop sign, you must yield to the person making the u-turn.  I have heard it at least a thousand times. “I stopped before making my right on red”.  That is true, but you have a traffic control device that you have to obey.  The person making the u-turn does not have a traffic control device and has the right of way.  This may be hard for some people to understand until they have to make a u-turn and expect the right of way. In the diagram below, the driver with the red arrow has the right of way if he has a green arrow or light. The driver with the green arrow has to make sure it is clear from all directions before they can make the right on red legally. This is usually the case. Sometimes there are traffic signs saying that the driver making the u-turn has to yield to a vehicle making a right turn.

Next week we’ll have “The Dreaded Four Way Stop Sign Issue” for you. Until then, drive safe!!!

Clean U-turn Graphic.png

###

Traffic Crash Weekly Summary:

Monday, June 24th through Sunday, July 8th, 2019 (a two week span), there were 154 traffic crashes worked by the Cape Coral Police Department (down from 171 the previous two weeks).

REMINDER: If you have traffic concerns, you can submit them here: www.capecops.com/traffic. Your concern will be routed directly to the Traffic Unit for follow-up. Please be as detailed as possible to include things like days of week, times you are seeing the issue, or specific cars (if it is a particular vehicle with which you are having an issue).

About the Author:

IMG_5502.jpg

Master Sergeant Patrick O'Grady is a 24 year veteran of law enforcement, assigned to the Office of the Chief of Police. He serves as a Public Affairs Officer for the Cape Coral Police Department and oversees the Public Affairs Office and the Planning and Research Unit.

Master Sergeant O’Grady has previously served as a Patrol Officer, Field Training Officer, DUI Officer, Drug Recognition Expert and a Traffic Homicide Investigator. He has also served as a supervisor in the Patrol Bureau over district officers and the Field Training and Evaluation Program. Master Sergeant O’Grady has served in the Special Operations Bureau as a supervisor of the Nighttime Traffic Unit and Major Crash Investigators. He is an instructor for the Cape Coral Police Department on several different topic areas and holds several certifications. Master Sergeant O’Grady holds a Bachelors Degree in Criminal Justice from Hodges University.

###


CAPE CORAL POLICE DEPARTMENT | Public Affairs Office | 1100 Cultural Park Boulevard | Cape Coral, FL 33990 | (239) 242-3341

What Is The Proper Way To Turn At An Intersection?

What Is The Proper Way To Turn At An Intersection?

On this Traffic Tuesday we cover the proper way of turning at an intersection.

As you drive around the city you will see cars making turns from one roadway onto another.  Is there a proper lane to turn into when turning?  The answer is yes.

Florida Statute 316.151 - Required position and method of turning at intersections.

  1. The driver of a vehicle intending to turn at an intersection shall do as follows:

a. Right Turn. - Both the approach for a right turn and a right turn shall be made as close as practicable to the right-hand curb or edge of the roadway.

b. Left Turn. - the driver of a vehicle intending to turn left at any intersection shall approach the intersection in the extreme left-hand lane lawfully available to traffic moving in the direction of travel of such vehicle, and, after entering the intersection, the left turn shall be made so as to leave the intersection in a lane lawfully available to traffic moving in such direction upon the roadway being entered.  

What does this really mean?

If a driver is going to make a right turn, the vehicle should be turning from the right lane of the roadway it is currently on unless there are two right turn lanes. The vehicle needs to turn into the lane closest to the curb.

If a driver is going to make a left turn, the vehicle should be turning from a lane designated as a left turn lane or lane which allows left turns to be made. The vehicle should turn into the extreme-left hand lane or median lane.

The picture below illustrates how to turn properly. Now you know the law and what it means.  Drive safe!!!

IMG_0085.JPG
IMG_5502.jpg

About the Author:

Master Sergeant Patrick O'Grady is a 24 year veteran of law enforcement, assigned to the Office of the Chief of Police. He serves as a Public Affairs Officer for the Cape Coral Police Department and oversees the Public Affairs Office and the Planning and Research Unit.

Master Sergeant O’Grady has previously served as a Patrol Officer, Field Training Officer, DUI Officer, Drug Recognition Expert and a Traffic Homicide Investigator. He has also served as a supervisor in the Patrol Bureau over district officers and the Field Training and Evaluation Program. Master Sergeant O’Grady has served in the Special Operations Bureau as a supervisor of the Nighttime Traffic Unit and Major Crash Investigators. He is an instructor for the Cape Coral Police Department on several different topic areas and holds several certifications. Master Sergeant O’Grady holds a Bachelors Degree in Criminal Justice from Hodges University.

###


CAPE CORAL POLICE DEPARTMENT | Public Affairs Office | 1100 Cultural Park Boulevard | Cape Coral, FL 33990 | (239) 242-3341